News

Feb01

An ill wind blows for Denmark’s green energy revolution

An ill wind blows for Denmark’s green energy revolution. Denmark has long been a role model for green activists, but now it has become one of the first countries to turn against turbines. Dong, the state owned energy company and the largest developer of wind farms in Denmark, has announced that it is not developing further onshore wind farms because of public opposition to large turbines. It is now concentrating on offshore development http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/denmark/7996606/An-ill-wind-blows-for-Denmarks-green-energy-revolution.html
Jan24

Coldingham Turbine Collapses

The Swedish manufacturer of the 30.2m turbine that was collapsed for safety reasons at Bogan Farm, near Coldingham, after only two weeks in operation had itself collapsed into bankruptcy on 1st October 2011

  The bankruptcy of Hannevind surprised many in the wind industry, as the Swedish firm was thought to provide a better quality product than many in the sector. Simon Maden, of Maden Design, who erected the faulty turbine, stated in the local press that, “It looks like the turbine’s break [sic] mechanisms failed. All parties decided a controlled collapse was the way to go. If we ever found ourselves in the same situation again I wouldn’t do anything differently. “Things were made more difficult by the fact the turbine manufacturers are no longer in business. We were only alerted to this recently and it meant we couldn’t go to them for any advice. I am satisfied the turbine was installed correctly and properly tested.” 2 1 ‘Hannevind Vindkraft AB’, Bloomberg Businessweek. 2 ‘Turbine brought down due to mechanical failure’, Berwick Advertiser, 18 December, 2011. 3 ‘Turbine installer Icon Energy hit by Proven collapse’, BBC News, 14 October 2011. 4 ‘Scots bid to keep Proven local as small wind faces sceptics’, Recharge News, 21 September, 2011. 5 ‘Wind turbines ripped apart by gale force winds in Hudddersfield’, Huddersfield Daily Examiner, 6 January, 2012. 6 ‘More trouble with wind turbines’, Shropshire Star, 20 January, 2012.
Jan23

Enertrag believe there is no opposition for its wind farm at Blackmains

Enertrag believe there is no opposition for its wind farm at Blackmains as until January 2012 received only two letters of opposition. It has already received several more emails and letters from local people who Oppose Blackmains. PLEASE TELL ENERTRAG THAT YOU ARE OPPOSED TO BLACKMAINS by letter to Mr Christopher Small, Enertrag 2 George Square Castle Brae Dunfermline KY11 8QF or email christopher.small@enertrag.com and James.Spencer-Nairn@enertrag.com and please copy in OpposeBlackmains@hotmail.co.uk
										
Jan04

Vestas the Danish wind-turbine makers have had their target price slashed 4 January 2012

Credit Suisse is of the opinion that the company faces "acute" risks as regards its financial flexibility, adding that, "we do not see any positives for Vestas until structural and cyclical macro factors are addressed."  Full article www.ft.com/cms/s/0/5cd31cbe-36ea-11e1-b741-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1jvhCONeY
Dec18

More personnel changes at Enertrag

The second in as few months.  Carolynne Sutherland, the Project Manager for Blackmains left the company in December 2011 following Neil Lindsay, previously the Managing Director of Enertrag, who left in November 2011
Dec16

Wind turbines bursting into flames are not uncommon

They are caused by gear oil failures in wind turbines.  They occur because no gear oil has yet been invented to withstand the extreme pressures produced within these transmissions.  The latest attempt to solve this problem has seen the US Government give Dow-Corning a big grant to work on a solution – the status of the project can be seen at  www.nrel.gov/wind/pdfs/day3_sessionv_3_dowcorning_jungk.pdf  It seems the solution is some years away it also shows that gear box failures are not uncommon (average one every 8 years).  Even if they don’t result in spectacular fires like the one in Ardrossan in December – it is one too many.
Dec04

How safe are wind turbines?

The storms in December saw two major incidents with wind turbines in Scotland. A 100-metre tall wind turbine burst into flames in North Ayrshire, and at Drone Hill, near Coldingham in the Scottish Borders, a turbine crashed to the ground yards from a road. How safe is it to propose seven wind turbines at 125 metres (49 metres higher than those at Drone Hill) less than a 1000 metres from the A1 and less than 800 metres from residential buildings. Check out www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/weather/8944597/Blown-away-gales-wreck-wind-turbines-as-Scottish-storm-wreck-havoc.html